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3 Mobility Exercises You Need at Any Age

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When was the last time you did exercises for improving your mobility? It’s easy to take our daily movements for granted. But every movement you make, from reaching for something on a shelf to running a marathon is made possible by your mobility. No matter your age, it’s important to regularly exercise your mobility to ensure optimal movement now, and in the future!

Why Mobility Exercises are Important

Your body’s mobility can suffer as a result of stiff joints, injuries, and lack of physical activity. Reduced mobility can easily be noticed by limited range of motion, difficulty standing after sitting for long periods of time, even trouble walking properly. It’s not uncommon for people to not realize how much their mobility has been impacted until a movement that once was easy to do, is now painful or limited.

Mobility exercises are not just about improving mobility but also preserving it. One of the best things you can do for your mobility is to actively use it. Mobility exercises such as stretching can help strengthen muscles while reducing tension, improving stabilization, and reducing risk of injury. The sooner you incorporate mobility exercises into your routine, the better chances you have of preserving your mobility for years to come!

3 Easy Mobility Exercises

Piriformis/Glute Stretch 

This stretch is fantastic if you find yourself sitting in a desk or car for long periods of time. Hips can hold a lot of tension and tightness, and this stretch is great at helping to open up those muscles. To do this stretch, sit on the floor with one leg bent in front of you, and the other laid out straight behind you. Place your hands in front of you, shoulders length apart next to your bent leg with your head raised high. Depending on your comfortability, you can deepen the stretch by resting your forearms on the floor, in front of the bent leg, and slowly lean forward towards your rest forearms. 

Piriformis/Glute Stretch mobility exercise

Standing Quad Stretch 

Your quadriceps are consistently working throughout the day whether you’re walking, standing, or sitting. It is important to spend time every day stretching out these muscles and giving them the ability to properly relax. To do this stretch, stand up straight, feet shoulder length apart. If you need a little extra stability, feel free to stand next to a wall for you to place your hand on. Slowly bend one leg up behind you and hold with your hand. The more the leg is bent, the deeper of a stretch you will feel in the quadriceps!

standing quad stretch mobility exercise

One Sided Chest Opener 

Having good posture plays a large role in maintaining proper mobility. This stretch is great for helping to better the overall posture while opening up the tightness that your chest holds throughout the day. Standing in a doorway, place one forearm up onto the wall with your elbow at a 90 degree angle. Slowly step forward while your forearm stays in place, and feel this stretch open up your chest muscles!

one sided chest opener mobility exercise

Improve Your Mobility With Assisted Stretching

One of the best mobility exercises you can do that can easily be incorporated into your current routine is assisted stretching. Assisted stretching offers the opportunity to experience a deeper, more concentrated stretch. It also allows for the incorporation of advanced stretching techniques that can enhance the benefits of the stretch. If you’re looking to improve or preserve your mobility, consider stretching with a highly trained professional like a Flexologist! Learn more about booking your first stretch here.


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